Search for God & Guinness

Search for God & Guinness

A Biography of the Beer That Changed the World

by Stephen Mansfield
Hardcover, 304 pages
Current Retail Price: $24.99
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While some claim God's people don't drink alcohol, the story of Arthur Guinness and his delicious beverage proves otherwise. The Search for God and Guinness is equal parts travelogue, cultural history, and Christian apologetic as Stephen Mansfield traces the origins of the famous Dublin brew and the men responsible for it. The story is unfamiliar to most of the world, despite the fact that over 10 million glasses of Guinness stout are consumed every day.

Arthur Guinness was a good Christian before he was a good brewmaster. Distressed by the rampant alcoholism of 18th century Dublin, he wanted a healthy, tasty beverage without the horrible effects of gin and whiskey (favorite libations of his day).

He invented a creamy stout that is one of the best-tasting beer recipes available and one of the most popular drinks on the planet. He also began a trend of Christian philanthropy that the Guinness family has continued for 250 years, treating company employees and the poor with hospitality and generosity in the name of Christ.

A journalist, Mansfield's prose is easy to read and often funny. A Christian himself, his study of the Guinness tradition is well-considered and favorable. He even considers objections from teetotaling believers and starts with a brief history of beer and its relationship to the Church, beginning with the forgotten story of the Pilgrims's first meeting with the Indian Samoset.

This isn't just a fun story—Mansfield's love of history stems from its capacity to make us wiser people, and this chronicle of the Guinness family and their beer is no exception. Whether you like beer or not, if you love Christ and His work, you'll love Guinness after reading this book.

Review by C. Hollis Crossman
C. Hollis Crossman used to be a child. Now he is a husband and father, teaches adult Sunday school in his Presbyterian congregation, and likes weird stuff. He might be a mythical creature, but he's definitely not a centaur. Read more of his reviews here.

Review by C. Hollis Crossman
C. Hollis Crossman used to be a child. Now he's a husband and father who loves church, good food, and weird stuff. He might be a mythical creature, but he's definitely not a centaur. Read more of his reviews here.
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Exodus Rating:
FLAWS: Can a book about beer be flawed?
Summary: The story of Guinness beer which somewhat surprisingly begins as a Christian mercy work on the mean streets of Dublin.

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