Radical Disciple

Radical Disciple

Some Neglected Aspects of Our Calling

by John R. W. Stott
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
Hardcover, 144 pages
Current Retail Price: $15.00
Used Price: $9.00 (1 in stock) Condition Policy

In an age when truth and meaning are despised, the question "What is a Christian?" is answered in very strange ways. This simple book by John Stott provides the only honest answer Christians can give, one rooted in the Bible and historic doctrine.

Each Christian must be The Radical Disciple. Stott offers eight distinguishing characteristics: noncomformity, Christlikeness, maturity, creation care, simplicity, balance, dependence, and death.

The term radical comes from the Latin word for "root" and refers to a deeply held belief evidenced by a life of commitment. Stott uses the word disciple rather than Christian because it evokes a teacher-pupil relationship, and we're all students of Jesus Christ.

This isn't difficult to read, but it's convicting. The last book Stott wrote, The Radical Disciple reflects what he found vital to the Christian life during his long life. It addresses matters important to Western Christians now, like materialism and environmentalism.

Unlike many similar books, however, Stott's is absolutely Christ-centered, biblically focused, and straightforward. He doesn't avoid direct moral pronouncements, or soften the hard words of our Savior. In the chapter on maturity, for example, he exhorts us to pursue spiritual maturity, and calls out the rampant immaturity of the modern Church.

However, this is a call for personal reformation. The last chapter is about death as the final element of sanctification, showing how little Stott cares about making us feel good about ourselves.

The subtitle of The Radical Disciple calls the book "Some Neglected Aspects of Our Calling," and these are, sadly, increasingly ignored elements of the Christian life; we hope and pray this book will help restore them to their central position. Highly recommended.

Review by C. Hollis Crossman
C. Hollis Crossman used to be a child. Now he is a husband and father, teaches adult Sunday school in his Presbyterian congregation, and likes weird stuff. He might be a mythical creature, but he's definitely not a centaur. Read more of his reviews here.

Review by C. Hollis Crossman
C. Hollis Crossman used to be a child. Now he's a husband and father who loves church, good food, and weird stuff. He might be a mythical creature, but he's definitely not a centaur. Read more of his reviews here.
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Exodus Rating
Summary: This provocative book written at the end of Stott's life and ministry outlines what it means to follow Christ in the 21st century.

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