Home Machinist's Handbook

Home Machinist's Handbook

by Doug Briney
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
1st Edition, ©1984, ISBN: 9780830615735
Trade Paperback, 275 pages
Price: $19.95

Doug Briney emphasizes from the outset the importance of investing in quality tools rather than settling for the cheapest you can find. In the end, paying more for a good tool is less expensive than having to continually replace or repair a bad one. Having said that, this isn't a book for the professional machinist able to pay any amount for state-of-the-art equipment. The Home Machinist's Handbook is for the do-it-yourselfer, tinkerer and inventor who needs guidance in the use of machine tools.

When someone learns to play the piano they generally start by learning to read music. Briney begins with the machinist's equivalent--reading prints, the plans which precede the final product. From there he covers measurements, selecting the right tools and materials, using lathes, heat treating and finishing parts, etc. The final chapter contains specs and instructions for a number of projects, followed by an appendix of measurement conversions and tables to help you through some of the technical aspects. (He even includes plans for making a 16th-century ship's cannon!)

Profusely illustrated with black and white illustrations and drawings, this is the kind of guide every hobbyist wishes they had for their chosen field. Topics like safety and technique are thoroughly addressed. Whether you plan to work on your boat, model train or radio-controlled airplane, or want to make tools, doorknobs and gun parts, Briney gives you everything you need to get started and progress with confidence to a state of proficiency. If you want to learn the machinist's art but don't know how to begin--or if you've begun and want to go further--The Home Machinist's Handbook is the book you need.

Review by C. Hollis Crossman
C. Hollis Crossman used to be a child. Now he is a husband and father, teaches adult Sunday school in his Presbyterian congregation, and likes weird stuff. He might be a mythical creature, but he's definitely not a centaur. Read more of his reviews here.

Review by C. Hollis Crossman
C. Hollis Crossman used to be a child. Now he's a husband and father who loves church, good food, and weird stuff. He might be a mythical creature, but he's definitely not a centaur. Read more of his reviews here.
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Summary: Practical guide to teaching yourself machining at home.

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