Words Aptly Spoken

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Reading is an essential part of any education. But not just any reading—while perusing magazines, websites, and popular novels may be fun and (sometimes) instructive, it's the books generally accepted as "classics" to which educators and parents turn in order to show their students what the world is like and how to best live in it.

As a result, most literature courses for homeschool kids focus on Newbery books, the works of Dickens and Austen, famous short stories, historical speeches and documents, etc.Words Aptly Spoken is no exception. Compiled and edited by Jen Greenholt, each of these five volumes explores great literature and uses it to teach literary analysis and writing.

How Do These Work?

These books comprise the literature portion of the middle/high school courses forClassical Conversations, but you can easily useWords Aptly Spoken on its own. Children's Literature andShort Storiesfor middle school correspond toClassical Conversations Challenge A and B.American Literature,American Documents, andBritish Literature are all for high school.

Short Stories andAmerican Documents include all the reading material needed;American Literature includes some of the literature though you'll also need to get some longer works elsewhere; andChildren's Literature andBritish Literature include none of the reading material you'll need to procure for your students.

Each book includes two basic elements: comprehension and thought questions for each reading assignment, and information for improving literary analysis and writing skills. Students read an assignment (a poem, short story, political speech, chapters from a novel, or whatever), answer/discuss the qustions, and complete a writing or contemplation assignment.

This is intended as a parent/teacher-directed course. Rather than writing the answers to all the questions, students and parents should discuss them. Some suggest having a book for the parent and another for the student, but this is unnecessary. Students motivated to study literature could probably do this on their own, though some measure of guidance is important.

Reading assignments include everything fromJohnny TremainandWhere the Red Fern Grows, to the U. S. Constitution, toJane Eyre andCharles Colson's Born Again. At least one of these books (Johnny Tremain) is used for two different volumes in the series—Children's Literature andAmerican Literature.

Students learn to identify and understand various genres, cite works, analyze characters, organize their thoughts for an essay, make connections, create timelines, place works in their historical context, and much more throughout the series. The methodology involves using what students read to draw out broader critical thinking, literary analysis, and writing skills.

BecauseWords Aptly Spoken is part ofClassical Conversations, there's an emphasis on the modern definition of Classical-style education. That is, students work through the Grammar, Logic, and Rhetoric stages, learning the basic language of literature, how to think logically and creatively about it, and how to express those ideas well.

In order to achieve this effect, you'll need to use all five levels ofWords Aptly Spoken. New concepts are layered in gradually as the program progresses, so that when students reach the last volume (British Literature) they're able to work with more difficult ideas and vocabulary. Parents need not fear, however: you'll learn alongside your kids, and all you need is in these books.

No attempt is made to make the content "fun" in the sense of games and whatnot. All the volumes exceptChildren's Literature are illustrated in black and white, but the books are large and the print is small and it would actually have been preferable to include more illustrations to break up the text.

Our Honest Opinion

TheWords Aptly Spokenbooks are described as "companion guides to classics," and are best used as such. While you could get by teaching literature and literary analysis using these books alone, there would be gaps in your kids' understanding that would be filled by more comprehensive courses like James Stobaugh'sSkills for Literary Analysis andSkills for Rhetoric or the literature guides from Institute for Excellence in Writing.

The greatest benefit of this program is to expose students to a range of literature, though some of the selections seem a bit odd (like having high school students readThe Sign of the Beaver andStarship Troopers in the same year). The format also seems a lot like the Andrews'sTeaching the Classics, with the question/answer element ofInvitation to the Classics, both of which are excellent programs in their own right.

There are definitely some gaps in the material. For instance, in the section ofBritish Literature devoted to George Orwell'sAnimal Farm, students are instructed to find a "credible source" to learn about early 20th century political ideologies, yet no definition of credible source is offered in the text. There are also no indexes in any of the books, and only limited glossaries, making the use of any of these books in a reference capacity very difficult.

Because this is aClassical Conversations course, we'd obviously recommend it for anyone using that program. For those whose kids aren't enrolled, this could be a good choice for application of literary analysis principles, but we'd recommend using a course that more thoroughly explains these principles beforehand. The IEW courseWindows to the World by Lesha Myers, or the above-mentioned Stobaugh books are excellent options.

Review by C. Hollis Crossman
C. Hollis Crossman used to be a child. Now he is a husband and father, teaches adult Sunday school in his Presbyterian congregation, and likes weird stuff. He might be a mythical creature, but he's definitely not a centaur.Read more of his reviewshere.

 

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6 Items found Print
Wakeful Words
by Jen Greenholt
from Classical Conversations
for 6th-12th grade
in Words Aptly Spoken (Location: LITSG-WAS)
$12.00 $8.40 (2 in stock)
Words Aptly Spoken: American Documents
by Jen Greenholt, ed.
2nd edition from Classical Conversations
for 9th-11th grade
in Words Aptly Spoken (Location: LITSG-WAS)
$19.99
Words Aptly Spoken: American Literature
by Jen Greenholt, ed.
2nd edition from Classical Conversations
for 9th-11th grade
in Words Aptly Spoken (Location: LITSG-WAS)
$19.99 $14.00 (1 in stock)
Words Aptly Spoken: British Literature
by Jen Greenholt, ed.
2nd edition from Classical Conversations
for 9th-12th grade
in Words Aptly Spoken (Location: LITSG-WAS)
$19.99
Words Aptly Spoken: Children's Literature
by Jen Greenholt, ed.
from Classical Conversations
for 7th-9th grade
in Words Aptly Spoken (Location: LITSG-WAS)
$19.99 $14.00 (1 in stock)
Words Aptly Spoken: Short Stories
by Jen Greenholt, ed.
3rd edition from Classical Conversations
for 7th-12th grade
in Words Aptly Spoken (Location: LITSG-WAS)
$19.99