Brinton Turkle

Brinton Turkle

A native of Alliance, Ohio, Turkle was born on August 15, 1915, to parents Edgar, a funeral director, and his wife Ada. As a boy Turkle enjoyed drawing, reading, music, and building more than he liked baseball or playing outside, and this set him apart from other boys. Somewhat unhappy as a child, Turkle found solace in Gertrude Alice Kay, a published author and illustrator who encouraged Turkle's artistic talent and helped convince his parents he had ability.

His love for drama as well as illustrating pulled him into Carnegie Institute of Technology, now called Carnegie-Mellon University, until he realized that it was a profession that wouldn't pay him well. Turning back to drawing, he attended the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and perceived an idea for a children's book. When the book never realized fruition, Turkle settled for Chicago's advertising world for a time. After marrying his wife, Turkle moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico to start fresh. He worked as a free lance illustrator of books and joined the Santa Fe Community Theatre. As his family grew in number, Turkle realized he needed more job security and a better income to support them. The family then headed to New York.

Writing and illustrating books for other people consumed much of Turkle's time. Yet in his brief free moments, he attempted writing his own stories. Over time his thoughts produced his first book called Obadiah the Bold based on a shy Quaker boy. Three more books about Obadiah followed, including the 1970 Caldecott Honor Award winner, Thy Friend, Obadiah. Turkle had a talent for blending his words with his pictures, creating interdependence. He wrote about the human spirit and its amazing capabilities to overcome hardships, the power of truth, and the respect for life. Overall, Turkle wrote and illustrated numerous children's books, and for other authors, he illustrated over 100 books.

When he wasn't writing or illustrating, Turkle spent time at the theater by acting, directing, and designing sets for plays. He spent his remaining years in Santa Fe, having returned there in the 1970s. Turkle has since passed away.

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Bibliography:

  • Stevie’s Other Eyes 1962
  • Obadiah the Bold 1965
  • Lollipop Party 1967
  • Magic of Millicent Musgrave 1967
  • Fiddler of High Lone 1968
  • Fiddler of High Lonesome 1968
  • Granny and the Indians 1969
  • Jake 1969
  • Thy Friend, Obadiah 1969
  • Sky Dog 1969
  • Catch a Little Fox 1970
  • Mooncoin Castle 1970
  • Adventures of Obadiah 1972
  • It’s Only Arnold 1973
  • Poor Richard in France 1973
  • Deep in the Forest 1976
  • Island Time 1976
  • Nino Que No Creia en la Premavera, El (The Boy Did Not Believe in the Spring 1976)
  • Rachel and Obadiah 1978
  • Do Not Open 1981
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5 Items found
Boy Who Didn't Believe in Spring (Library Rebind)
by Lucille Clifton & Brinton Turkle
1st Unicorn Edition from E.P. Dutton & Co.
for Kindergarten-2nd grade
in Picture Books (Location: PICTURE)
$4.00 (1 in stock)
Obadiah the Bold
by Brinton Turkle
from Beautiful Feet Books
Historical Fiction for Kindergarten-3rd grade
in Picture Books (Location: PICTURE)
$8.46
Rachel and Obadiah
by Brinton Turkle
from Beautiful Feet Books
Historical Fiction for Kindergarten-3rd grade
in Picture Books (Location: PICTURE)
$8.46
Thy Friend, Obadiah
by Brinton Turkle
from Beautiful Feet Books
Realistic Animal Stories for Kindergarten-3rd grade
1970 Caldecott Honor Book
in Picture Books (Location: PICTURE)
$8.46
Thy Friend, Obadiah (hardcover)
by Brinton Turkle
from Beautiful Feet Books
Realistic Animal Stories for Kindergarten-3rd grade
1970 Caldecott Honor Book
in Picture Books (Location: PICTURE)