CLOSED October 20th. Sign up for our newsletter to learn more!
 
Biblical Economics

Biblical Economics

A Commonsense Guide to Our Daily Bread

by R. C. Sproul Jr.
Publisher: Tolle Lege Press
Hardcover, 219 pages
Current Retail Price: $16.00

Thomas Carlyle called economics the "dismal science" because of the injustices he perceived in a supply-and-demand market. R.C. Sproul, Jr. takes a far different approach, actually affirming the life-giving nature of economics. But not just any economics—biblical economics, as opposed to the humanistic and godless approaches with which men attempt to achieve prosperity without God's help. Undertaking a dual-purpose in this highly readable volume, Sproul outlines the basic principles of economics and demonstrates the biblical attitude of stewardship.

Many concepts that seem particularly difficult to the uninitiated (like the nature of mercantilism, or why American inflation affects the global economy) are made plain through Sproul's thorough yet jargon-free explanations. For every principle introduced he offers a biblical perspective, as well as a groundwork for personal application. The goal isn't simply to inform readers about the nature of the American economic system, but to challenge Christians to think and behave within it as Christians should.

This text is especially welcome at a time when much of the Church seems to be preoccuppied with social justice issues and a sense of guilt concerning the acquisition of wealth. While it's true that we need to care for the poor (but which poor? and in what order?) and that riches can shift our focus from Christ, it's equally true that God often blesses hard work, and wealth should not be spurned simply on principle. Rather, Sproul suggests, it should be used to further the Kingdom and to care for the poor among us.

Eminently practical and theoretically sound, Biblical Economics is a welcome addition to the literature of economics and stewardship. By clearly relating the two Sproul is able to demonstrate why economic systems matter, why some are better than others, and why Christians in particular should be involved. The subtitle, A Commonsense Guide to Our Daily Bread, is about the best summation of the content—though the excellent sense Sproul expresses is far from common. Equal parts guidebook and wake-up call, this belongs on the shelf of every Christian who's ever bought, sold or been employed.

Review by C. Hollis Crossman
C. Hollis Crossman used to be a child. Now he is a husband and father, teaches adult Sunday school in his Presbyterian congregation, and likes weird stuff. He might be a mythical creature, but he's definitely not a centaur. Read more of his reviews here.

Table of Contents:

  • Foreword

    1. Introduction
    2. Stewardship
    3. Creation
    4. Prosperity
    5. Profit
    6. Money
    7. Inflation
    8. Debt
    9. Poverty
    10. Equity
    11. Government
    12. Leviathan
    13. Outlook
    Notes
Review by C. Hollis Crossman
C. Hollis Crossman used to be a child. Now he's a husband and father who loves church, good food, and weird stuff. He might be a mythical creature, but he's definitely not a centaur. Read more of his reviews here.
Did you find this review helpful?

Exodus Rating
Summary: Exploration of Christian stewardship in the context of broad economic concepts.

Related Categories
Recommended for...